Skills to Focus on in Business Development Coaching Sessions

When you’re a coach who assists businesspeople with developing their company, you’ll help them face challenges, fears and opportunities head on. Regardless of how long you’ve been in the industry, you’ll discover that when you aim to help clients build specific skills, they’ll receive lasting benefits.

Flexibility

A flexible attitude can help members of the corporate world handle tough economic conditions, unsatisfied customers and discouraged employees. However, it’s often a difficult characteristic to cultivate, particularly in entrepreneurs.

Sometimes, a client might feel that if they really want to achieve all they set out to do, they must decide on one way of doing things, and stick to it. Through business development coaching, you can show clients that although dedication is valuable, it must be paired with a willingness to adapt to circumstances.

You’ll also need to strengthen this quality in yourself. Client meetings don’t always go as planned. Often, this is exciting, but it requires inner resilience, too. It’s helpful to have an outline for certain things that you want to accomplish with a client. However, when you go off course, view it as an opportunity. By keeping the conversation flowing, you might uncover new things that a client hadn’t revealed before.

Besides, when a business development coaching client feels that their session isn’t overly structured, they’ll be more open about discussing things that might not always relate to the topic at hand.

Self-Reflection

People must be willing to evaluate themselves. This is something that’s true in all industries, and particularly for people who are involved in leadership roles.

Help your clients see that when they’re willing to engage in self-reflection, they’ll simultaneously become more confident. A fear of failure is an emotion that you’ll likely encounter frequently during business development coaching sessions. However, taking chances is necessary to help a company thrive.

By encouraging clients to practice self-reflection regularly, you’ll assist them in becoming more comfortable with potential setbacks. Offer them a safe environment in which to talk about the positive factors, as well as things that they wish they’d done differently in the course of running their business.

Make sure you practice self-reflection, as well. Get into a routine where you look back on client sessions at least once per day.

Soon, you’ll find that it’s easier to become a more valuable contributor to the world of business development coaching. Clients will depend on you to help them improve themselves. However, you’ll get the best results by suggesting strategies that are very similar to things that you should practice to enrich your own skills.

Lucrative Openings For Business Development Jobs

Business development jobs are immense these days. People are getting good offers from some of the best Companies as there is rising need for these jobs all over India. In actual terms, every business – big or small wants to have a business development manager to promote business and make new customers. This helps in increasing the return on investments and awareness about a particular business entity amongst clients and competitors.

Business development jobs are crucial jobs in the industry. This job requires complete understanding of the business and its development. People with experience in particular industry get jobs easily because of their professional approach to the business.

This job is suited for Marketing-oriented people who have good knowledge of market and understand the clients well. Every market entity needs business promotion, but due to recession, people had curbed their expenses and stopped hiring business development managers for their business promotion.

The recession phase is completely over and people are coming back to normal schedule of business. Therefore, the hiring of professionals has also begun. One who has more knowledge is placed at better positions as compared to fresher.

Business development jobs are crucial for the industry. An efficient Manager will take the business to greater heights and vice-versa. Therefore, care should be taken while selecting the right Business Manager for the firm. Business development jobs are as per business requirements. Therefore, person opting for this job must understand the implications before applying for it.

Business development job openings are available in almost every industry. This implies that anyone can get the job with proper experiences. The best way is to look into the online job site for the right job. These sites help in getting the right job at right place also. Suppose you are currently working in Mumbai and want a job in Delhi; then fill in Delhi as preferred location and get the best job options in Delhi.

Aspirants can log on to online job sites through internet and get the desired job options within a few days only. These job sites are quick to respond and provide excellent work opportunities to candidates.

Client Co-Marketing – Business Development for Law Firms

Client co-marketing builds relationships and sends an unmistakable message. Imagine you’re Senior Intellectual Property Counsel of a Fortune 100 company. Every law firm within two continents of your main office has begun posting commentary, sending communiques, and publishing articles about the latest milestone ruling – as of this writing, that would be KSR v. Teleflex. There’s an article in a national journal by someone at the Smith firm. Someone at the Jones firm has a piece in the local legal newspaper. Another publication, however, has an article co-written by the general counsel of a major manufacturer and a partner at the Thomas firm about the possible effects of KSR on business and legal management.

There’s a very good chance that the general counsel’s article will be the first that you as an in-house lawyer will read. There’s an equally good chance that you’ll assume the Thomas firm represents that company. And, there’s an awfully good chance that you’ll also assume the GC thinks the world of the Thomas firm to let his good name run on the same byline.

Seem obvious? Then why don’t we see more such co-written articles? Are clients resistant? One shouldn’t think so inasmuch as it’s simply good marketing for them as well. And, if you offer to do the first draft of the article, the added advantage for the client is that it’s good marketing with relatively little effort.

Here’s another example that approximates a recent situation I observed. A law firm partner was being profiled in a legal trade publication. Among her major achievements is a stellar litigation record on behalf of the XYZ Company. During and after the interview, the partner (and her PR firm) urged the reporter to call the AGC at XYZ, not just for a quotable endorsement, but to learn more about the astonishing things the client has done in-house to deter lawsuits and reduce in-house costs. When the article was finally published, it was as much about the client as the law firm, and both profited equally.

Greatness by Association

To be sure, marketing the law firm is not an “us or them” proposition. You can recruit inside counsel and even CEOs as parties to your own marketing and business development efforts. They will typically appreciate the request because they want to be marketed too.

Perhaps the in-house lawyer is looking for another job and a little notoriety won’t hurt. Or perhaps more public prominence is politically beneficial in terms of his or her internal career track. Maybe the client wants to highlight the fact that, as in our example above, his is the last company in its industry that a smart plaintiff’s lawyer should want to target.

Periodically, certain in-house legal managers emerge as spokespersons for the in-house sector. In the past, such spokespersons (my own memory stretches back as far as Robert Banks at Xerox in the 1980s) give speeches, write articles, and spearhead programmatic efforts to enunciate what they as inside counsel expect from outside counsel, and how, in general, in-house services ought to evolve.

Right now there seems to be available space for another such in-house market leader to emerge. Could that leader be one of your clients? Imagine the marketing benefits that would accrue to your firm if you helped him or her fill that space, especially if your “partnership” were widely known via joint conference appearances, for example, or a few of those aforesaid co-bylined articles.

The relationship benefits are obvious. Even more important in some ways, by being an identifiable part of the client’s efforts to define and implement new professional standards, you become a part of the solution to whatever problem is under discussion. You’re now part of a collective campaign – a close-knit community of buyers and sellers – to improve law firm billing practices or discourage frivolous law suits or enhance diversity in the legal profession or in the client’s own industry. The relationship that ensues with the client is very nice. The message you’re sending to untold numbers of other legal service buyers and decision-makers is very, very nice.

A Wealth of Opportunities

Remember all the favors that clients have asked of you: “Take a table” … Donate a silent auction item … Sponsor a hole in a charity golf tournament … Offer a summer associate position to the CFO’s daughter at Cornell Law … Donate to the GC’s law school alumni fund drive.

These requests all more or less help clients’ own marketing with little direct benefit to you, but they’re not shy about asking. So don’t you be shy with them – especially with requests that, as we’ve seen, benefit them at least as much as you.

We’ve mentioned professional events and publishing as two obviously salient examples of how to co-market. But there are other venues that will likewise enhance your relationship as well as send a valuable message about both the company and you to the broader market. Two in particular deserve mention.

Community Service Projects

First, community service projects offer a number of opportunities, particularly welcome to clients if their companies happen to sell stuff to that community. Some community service projects provide a bigger, more national bang for the PR buck: Habitat for Humanity comes to mind. If there are pro bono award events, invite the client to sit at your table.

Diversity

Second, diversity initiatives are near and dear to many legal service buyers. Explore ways for you and your client to jointly contribute to or support nonprofit organizations fostering diversity (the Minority Corporate Counsel Association, for instance). Don’t be deterred if your firm’s own diversity numbers are disappointing. There’s nothing wrong with acknowledging that one reason for your increased involvement is to improve the firm’s diversity recruitment efforts.

The examples above remind us that conjoint marketing with clients is – like all marketing – ultimately based on the delivery of value. As we like to emphasize, the person to whom you are marketing should be better off as a result of your doing so, regardless of whether or not they invest in your services as an immediate result. By co-marketing with clients, this “value proposition” operates in a uniquely multifaceted way.

Value

“Value” is delivered to the marketplace via the content of a speech or article – here’s an issue bedeviling our industry, and here’s how a corporate expert and outside counsel size it up.

“Value” is simultaneously delivered to the community and the profession as a result of specific actions, such as pro bono efforts and diversity initiatives.

“Value” is delivered to your clients because they have serious marketing agendas of their own. By joining with you in efforts to be helpful to the profession, to their own industry, and to the community at large, they directly advance those agendas.

For the law firm, the leverage is powerful: You build tangible credibility in front of unseen corporate decision- makers even as you take a single important client relationship to a wholly new and collaborative level. It’s a no-brainer. Call a client today and brainstorm projects.

Ad Agency New Business Development Secret – Mystery Shopping

For decades advertising agencies and communications firms have competed for new business in a high stakes race to show prospective clients how they can help them improve their business. The process usually involves review of credentials as well as demonstration of initial business ideas and thinking. Sounds exciting? Not really.

So, how does an ad agency get up to speed on a prospective client’s business enough to show them smart and relevant thinking?

Well, the internet has had a huge hand in helping agency management find information on a specific company as well as their industry – and often their key competitors. And many, if not all advertising agencies are using that approach in varying degrees. But that still leaves the burning question: “what are the decision makers and influencers experiencing throughout the sales process AND how can we control that in our favor?”

Traditionally, that is where agency quantitative (statistically sound surveying through the mail, phone or internet) as well as qualitative (more intimate, one-to-one communications usually through methods like focus groups) research is used to provide the foundation for strategic recommendations that will hopefully knock the socks off of their prospect and win the account.

Innovative advertising agencies are finding alternative ways to access this important insight which they previously obtained from those costly, time-consuming research approaches. These innovative ad agencies are developing their ideas and recommendations for the “review” or “pitch” by using an old mainstay from the restaurant industry – Mystery Shopping.

Mystery Shopping: An Innovative Business Development Tool

Mystery shopping has been used extensively in the hospitality sector to manage and improve customer service performance – as a way of more effectively managing the customer engagement from the first call to the check. This helps companies identify areas needing sales process improvement. Used in a slightly different context, it becomes a cost and time-effective goldmine of insight to perfect a business development pitch.

Mystery Shopping Process:

– Mystery shoppers, who represent the targeted customer profile, visit a specific site, experience all aspects of the sales process and fill out a customized online survey which is compiled with other shopper’s data from the company’s geography.

– The mystery shoppers are also trained to obtain any collateral or relevant materials, as well as take photos, and mail it back to the ad agency, giving the agency the ability to see, touch and feel tangible aspects of the experience and potentially use this information in their pitch.

– Using this approach has other advantages, too. Mystery shopping firms have large pools of trained researchers who can rapidly deliver on fast turn-around projects over broad geographic areas, including global reach.

– These surveys are tracked and trended against each location, for regional differences, and even against national averages. The data can then be used to direct recommendations, or support new ideas.

– In some cases mystery shoppers are only shopping competitive locations to provide information that will translate to opportunities for improvement and differentiation.

Instead of leaving behind somewhat dry research, advertising agencies are now immediately able to add interest and dimension to their pitch that sticks. Eliminating the problems inherent in focus group research such as one individual dominating a group’s input. What are some of the additional nuggets of information that ad agencies glean from their mystery shopping results?

1. Identifying Strategic Opportunities

2. Testing Brand Positioning

3. Discovering Triggers for Promotional Planning

4. Uncovering Valuable Competitive Intelligence

Savvy advertising agencies are even using mystery shopping as a form of insurance for promotional program executions. Mystery shopping is put in place when a promotion is rolled out to monitor and manage the operational aspects; ensuring that from signage placement to sales conversations everything is supporting the promotional message.

Mystery shopping is also helping both advertising agencies and their clients manage the multiple “Touchpoints” necessary to ensure a successful sales process improvement and customer relationship building. For the business it translates to sales and profit – reducing the expense to both acquire a new customer and to keep a customer engaged and loyal.

For ad agencies it provides the critical data on a prospective client that they need to show them relevant recommendations, sell themselves to, build a relationship and create loyalty. And, it provides it in a way that lends color and interest to the pitch – it excites, it is valued, and it sticks. The opportunity for strong, relevant insight exists in this simple, tried and true research process: mystery shopping. No wonder more ad agencies are using it!